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  • Glendale police continue to search for suspect, leads in fatal shooting

    GLENDALE, Ariz. – Police are continuing to search for a suspect and a motive in the fatal shooting of a local man who was found inside his apartment Saturday afternoon.Michael Simpson, 55, was suffering from several gunshot wounds when officers arrived at the scene in the area of 63rd and Maryland avenues just after 2:30 p.m., according to Sgt. David Vidaure, a Police Department spokesman.Officers had been sent there to investigate a caller’s report that shots had been fired.“The Glendale Fire Department responded to treat the victim who was pronounced deceased on scene. Detectives from the Violent Crimes Unit responded to investigate this homicide. There are neither suspects in custody nor any suspect descriptions,” Viduare stated in a prepared release.The Glendale Police Department is asking anyone who may have any information related to the shooting to call (623) 930-3000 or, to remain anonymous, contact Silent Witness at (480) WITNESS. That’s 480-948-6377.

  • Tucson bowler sets SC record

    The highest series ever bowled at a Recreation Centers of Sun City bowling center was rolled on Dec. 14.Kary Harris of Tucson rolled an 880 during the Arizona State Senior USBC Masters Tournament, based on information from the Recreation Centers of Sun City.Harris had games of 290, 290 and 300.Other notable performances during the Arizona State Senior USBC Open Tournament:• Warren Eales, two 300 games;• Greg Waldon, two 300 games;

  • Showdown set Monday in SC Central League

    The top two teams — Daily News-Sun and Ameriprise Financial — are headed for a Monday morning softball showdown in the Sun Cities Central League.Both teams posted wins Thursday at Sun Bowl Field in Sun City to set up a battle for first place at 11:15 a.m. Monday at Liberty Field in Sun City West.The Daily News-Sun improved to 12-1 with an 11-9 victory over Desert Rose while Ameriprise went to 11-2 with a 15-4 rout of Farrar Chiropractic.Paul Tone 14Ryan’s TD 13Dave McCart had three hits and belted a second-inning grand slam for Paul Tone.

  • Valley technology club tackles bioelectronics

    The Valley Engineering, Science and Technology Club will feature a lecture on bioelectronics at its next meeting, slated 11:30 a.m. Jan. 9 at Briarwood Country Club, 20800 N. 135th Ave., Sun City West.The lecture is titled, “Bioelectronics From Tricorder to Tiny Devices and Back.”The presenter will be Mark Porter, a senior principal reliability engineer and technical fellow from the Medtronic Tempe Campus.Porter is an active member of IEEE and holds certifications as a quality engineer and reliability engineer. He has a bachelor of science degree in physics from the University of New Hampshire and has held positions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, TRW Space Systems and Motorola.Porter will discuss some of the innovations that are changing the way medical care is being delivered and the profound changes that are being developed.He will provide an overview of some of the implantable devices that are on the horizon from the perspective of someone intimately involved in developing the technology and demonstrating their reliability.

  • Coldwell Banker remains perfect with 14th win

    Coldwell Banker improved to 14-0 Thursday with an 11-5 win over Larry Ott Realty during Sun Cities National League softball play at Liberty Field in Sun City West.Bob Williams had three hits with a pair of doubles and 4 RBI in the win.Sub Arnie Rehmann and Ray Keller each had three hits while Louie Gay made two sensational catches in left field to squelch bases-loaded rallies. Sub Al Schifini earned the pitching victory for Coldwell Banker.Tom Settje belted a third-inning grand slam for Larry Ott Realty.Thayne Heisel went 3-for-3 in the loss.Solar City 11

  • Glendale business raising money to protect police dogs

    GLENDALE, AZ - Two Glendale business owners are trying to raise money to protect the city’s police K-9 officers. Cherylynn Berry is co-owner of 2 Share Gift Shop in downtown Glendale. She donates a portion of the proceeds of all of her sales to help buy bulletproof vests for the dogs on the force. Berry is trying to outfit all six of the Glendale Police Department’s K-9s in time for the Super Bowl. Berry was moved to the cause after the department lost one of its dogs last year. “Ronin” was killed in the summer of 2013 while taking down a suspect. “We used to watch him in training outside the store,” Berry said. “When we realized he didn’t have a vest we wanted to do something.” For officers like Bryan Anderson, it would offer some relief. “The dogs are like family,” he said. “The vests cost $2,000 to $4,000 and they expire and need to be replaced every few years.” Anderson said the vests they currently have are worn and many don’t fit the dogs properly. Berry founded the non-profit 2 Share Foundation. You can also check out their Facebook page. They will continuously raise money. After helping Glendale police dogs they will look to fund dog vests for other West Valley departments.

  • Tick-tock: Tips for last-minute shoppers

    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The clock is ticking, and your holiday shopping list isn't complete. Don't fret — you aren't alone. The National Retail Federation found that only about half of shoppers had finished shopping as of Dec. 10. That means tens of millions will be ticking those final items off their lists in the coming days. But procrastination doesn't have to mean desperation. Here are a few tips to help survive last-minute shopping: —SEIZE THE DAY: Retailers know the rush is coming, and they are doing everything they can to attract last-minute shoppers. This includes extended shopping hours, expedited shipping and exclusive promotions. That opens up lots of strategies for shopping that will keep you out of the crazy lines in stores at noon on Christmas Eve. One tactic is to become a night owl. Many retailers are open longer in the week before Christmas. For example, Wal-Mart says its stores are open 24 hours a day up until 8 p.m. on Christmas Eve and it is offering shipping options up until Dec. 23. Toys R Us stores are open around the clock from the morning of Dec. 23 through 9 p.m. Christmas Eve; it also is extending its hours in the days preceding. And many retailers, such as Best Buy, allow shoppers to find an item online and pick it up at a store. Even 7-Eleven is targeting shoppers, offering gift cards, toys and stocking stuffers in its stores. The bottom line: Take advantage of those last-minute discounts and other deals. — DO YOUR HOMEWORK: Marshal Cohen, chief industry analyst at market researcher NPD Group, says many people do not yet know what they want to give, or get. "These consumers are the ones who put themselves in a stressful situation," he said. "The one saving grace is online (shopping) is a chance for a lot of people to do their homework." He said shoppers can narrow down their options ahead of time by looking online. You can also check Amazon.com to see if the person has a wish list you didn't know about, or study Facebook or Pinterest pages for ideas. Such prep work can save a lot of headaches and potentially limit last-minute impulse purchases that can prove costly. — WEAR COMFORTABLE SHOES: Seriously, this is a common-sense step many shoppers skip. "Wear comfortable shoes for goodness sake," Cohen said. "It (shopping) is exercise and it's not very comfortable." Don't waste time cruising to find the closest spot to the store either, he said. Those comfortable shoes will make it easier to just park and walk.

  • Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio aims to halt Obama immigration order

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A gadfly attorney and an Arizona county sheriff want to halt President Barack Obama's immigration order in the first courtroom battle over an initiative designed to spare nearly 5 million people from deportation. On Monday, lawyer Larry Klayman will try to convince a judge nominated by Obama that the immigration system isn't really broken — contrary to what the president says. Klayman and his client, Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, say the president violated the Constitution by doing an end-run around Congress and say drastic changes in immigration programs should be stopped. "President Obama and others recite that the immigration system of the United States is broken," Klayman wrote in a court filing. "It is unmistakable that the only thing that is broken about the nation's immigration laws is that the defendants are determined to break those laws." The case is being handled by U.S. District Judge Beryl Howell, former general counsel to the Senate Judiciary Committee and an Obama nominee. Klayman is a conservative who has previously targeted the president, alleging that Obama falsely claimed U.S. citizenship. In October, Klayman petitioned the Homeland Security Department to start deportation proceedings against Obama. Under the immigration program, the Homeland Security Department would prioritize the removal of immigrants who present threats to national security, public safety or border security. DHS officials could deport someone if an Immigration and Customs Enforcement field office director determined that removing the person would serve an important federal interest. In the lawsuit, Klayman and Arpaio portray the administration's policy change as a way for more people to enter the country illegally and commit crimes, adding to the burden of law enforcement. "This theory is speculative and unsubstantiated," the Justice Department argued in its own court filing. Obama's program places greater emphasis on removing criminal aliens and recent border crossers, the government countered. Among the evidence in the case is a set of Arpaio press releases and letters to Homeland Security officials that say more than 35 percent of immigrants living in Maricopa County illegally who wound up in Arpaio's jails in 2014 were repeat offenders, signifying in the sheriff's view that DHS has done a poor job of deporting criminals. Jennifer D. Elzea, a spokesperson for Immigration and Customs Enforcement, says that as a matter of policy, ICE does not comment on pending litigation. ICE, a DHS agency, can and does release immigrants who have been arrested on criminal charges, including those who have yet to be convicted, for a variety of reasons. In some instances, immigrants are released from immigration jails because they are from countries that won't provide travel documents or otherwise are not likely to be deported within a reasonable time.

  • N. Korea threatens strikes on US amid hacking claims

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — President Barack Obama is "recklessly" spreading rumors of a Pyongyang-orchestrated cyberattack of Sony Pictures, North Korea says, as it warns of strikes against the White House, Pentagon and "the whole U.S. mainland, that cesspool of terrorism." Such rhetoric is routine from North Korea's massive propaganda machine during times of high tension with Washington. But a long statement from the powerful National Defense Commission late Sunday also underscores Pyongyang's sensitivity at a movie whose plot focuses on the assassination of its leader Kim Jong Un, who is the beneficiary of a decades-long cult of personality built around his family dynasty. The U.S. blames North Korea for the cyberattack that escalated to threats of terror attacks against U.S. movie theaters and caused Sony to cancel "The Interview's" release. Obama, who promised to respond "proportionately" to the attack, told CNN's "State of the Union" in an interview broadcast Sunday that Washington is reviewing whether to put North Korea back on its list of state sponsors of terrorism The National Defense Commission, led by Kim, warned that its 1.2 million-member army is ready to use all types of warfare against the U.S. "Our toughest counteraction will be boldly taken against the White House, the Pentagon and the whole U.S. mainland, the cesspool of terrorism, by far surpassing the 'symmetric counteraction' declared by Obama," said the commission's Policy Department in a statement carried by the official Korean Central News Agency. North Korea has said it knows how to prove it had nothing to do with the hacking and proposed a joint investigation with the U.S. North Korea and the U.S., which fought each other in the 1950-53 Korean War, remain technically in a state of war because the conflict ended with an armistice, not a peace treaty. The U.S. stations about 28,500 troops in South Korea to deter aggression from North Korea. The rivals are locked in an international standoff over the North's nuclear and missile programs and its alleged human rights abuses. In the spring of last year, tension dramatically rose after North Korea issued a string of fiery threats to launch nuclear strikes against Washington and Seoul.

  • Haggen chain buying 146 Safeway, Albertsons stores

    BELLINGHAM, Wash. (AP) — No Albertsons or Safeway stores in the Northwest Valley are in line to be sold following an announcement by Washington state-based grocery chain Haggen Inc. that it plans to buy 146 Albertsons and Safeway stores in Arizona, Washington, Oregon, California and Nevada.The list includes two Safeway stores in Tucson and one in Anthem. No Albertson’s in Arizona are listed, according to Haggen, Inc.The Bellingham Herald reported the sales are required under the federal review of Safeway's sale to an investment group that owns Albertsons.If Haggen's plans announced Friday get Federal Trade Commission approval, the Bellingham-based company would expand from 18 stores and 16 pharmacies in the Northwest to 164 stores and 106 pharmacies in the five states.Details of the deal haven't been released.This is the largest of several sales related to the $7.6 billion sale of Safeway to investors led by Cerberus Capital Management. Associated Food Stores is buying eight stores in Montana and Wyoming, Associated Wholesale Grocers is purchasing 12 stores in Texas, and Supervalu is buying two Albertsons stores in Everett and Woodinville, Washington.

  • Scottsdale to use digital speed limit signs

    SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (AP) — The city of Scottsdale is installing digital speed-limit signs that will be able to change limits as needed. KSAZ-TV reports Scottsdale officials plan to implement four adjustable signs later this month. City Transportation Director Paul Basha says the signs will be programed to read either 35 mph or 25 mph during high traffic times. Speed will be reduced between 9 p.m. and 3 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and during special events. Some residents say they hope the signs don't create speed traps.

  • Woman hands baby off to stranger

    PHOENIX (AP) — Phoenix police say a woman allegedly gave her baby to a complete stranger because she couldn't afford to care for the child. Authorities say the 39-year-old mother approached another woman at a north Phoenix apartment complex Saturday night, telling her she didn't have money to feed or clothe the infant. The mother than allegedly handed her 3-month-old daughter to the woman before running off toward a mountainous area. Police located her at a home with the baby's father, along with a 12-year-old and an 18-month-old child. After interviewing the suspect, authorities had her transported for a psychiatric evaluation. The baby is now with the father. Police have not released the woman's name. They say the investigation will go to the Maricopa County Attorney's Office for review.

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  • ‘Antiques Roadshow’ revisits ‘Boomer Years’

    “Antiques Roadshow” on PBS is looking back with nostalgia at vintage treasures from the 1940s, ‘50s and ‘60s in a new special, “The Boomer Years.”“The ‘Baby Boom’ of the mid-20th century created a generation who grew up witnessing the rise of television, space exploration and rock ‘n’ roll,” said executive producer Marsha Bemko. “The treasures from that period make up some of our all-time favorite appraisals, so you can’t miss this new special.”In celebration of this post-war era, “The Boomer Years” features “the king” of appraisals with a 1956 Elvis Presley “Love Me Tender” standee that was found during a home renovation and brought to Roadshow by an avid Elvis fan. This is one of few standees known to exist: many are assumed to have been torn to shreds by fans who wanted a piece of Elvis to take home from the theater. Another highlight is a 1958 Martin Luther King Jr. letter purchased for $20 at the estate of a Richard Nixon biographer that includes King’s striking and candid opinions of Nixon. Finally, it wouldn’t be “The Boomer Years” without ”Peanuts!” A big find for the hour is a collection of Charles Schulz comic strip art that was owned by a former Hallmark employee who worked with Schulz for 12 years and is valued at $200,000 to $250,000.Take a trip down memory lane with “The Boomer Years” Monday night on PBS (check local listings).Part adventure, part history lesson, part treasure hunt, 12-time Emmy Award nominated “Antiques Roadshow” is in its 18th broadcast season. For more “Antiques Roadshow,” including full episodes, appraiser information, tips of the trade, bonus videos, a comprehensive archive, teacher resources and more, visit pbs.org/antiques. You can also find “Roadshow” on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Pinterest and Tumblr.

  • Music in sports highlighted at PBC Experience music workshop

    The Phoenix Boys Choir’s free music workshop returns from 9 a.m. to noon Jan. 24 with a new themed workshop.  Boys from around the Valley are invited to participate in the morning workshop to learn how to sing, read music and perform through activities themed around music from the sporting and gaming worlds.  The workshop culminates in a short performance for parents and friends to showcase everything the boys learned in the workshop. Boys will also enjoy a short performance by the Phoenix Boys Choir.Registration is at PhoenixBoysChoir.org.The PBC Experience Music Workshop takes place at the Phoenix Boys Choir building, 1131 E. Missouri Ave., Phoenix. There is no cost for the camp. Snacks and water will be provided.Participating boys will sing alongside current Phoenix Boys Choir members studying the fundamentals of expressive choral singing, music literacy and concert etiquette, led by members of the Phoenix Boys Choir artistic staff and Phoenix Boys Choir alumni.

  • Bands announced for McDowell Mountain Music Festival

    The three-day festival at Margaret T. Hance Park in downtown Phoenix March 27-29 will feature Widespread Panic, Passion Pit, Thievery Corporation, Phantogram, Portugal, The Man, Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, Beats Antique, Trampled by Turtles, StrFkr, Robert Delong and Break Science.Tickets are now on sale at MMMF.com. After-hours event passes will be on sale at a later date.John Largay, president of Wespac Construction, which has produced the non-profit music festival since 2004, said in a release: “This festival is a party for the people. It’s a community effort, engaging music enthusiasts to come out to enjoy an eclectic mix of talents and also to support notable charities in the Valley.”Proceeds from the festival benefit Phoenix Children’s Hospital Foundation and UMOM New Day Center, which provides homeless families and individuals with safe shelter, housing and supportive services.

  • Tick-tock: Tips for last-minute shoppers

    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The clock is ticking, and your holiday shopping list isn't complete. Don't fret — you aren't alone. The National Retail Federation found that only about half of shoppers had finished shopping as of Dec. 10. That means tens of millions will be ticking those final items off their lists in the coming days. But procrastination doesn't have to mean desperation. Here are a few tips to help survive last-minute shopping: —SEIZE THE DAY: Retailers know the rush is coming, and they are doing everything they can to attract last-minute shoppers. This includes extended shopping hours, expedited shipping and exclusive promotions. That opens up lots of strategies for shopping that will keep you out of the crazy lines in stores at noon on Christmas Eve. One tactic is to become a night owl. Many retailers are open longer in the week before Christmas. For example, Wal-Mart says its stores are open 24 hours a day up until 8 p.m. on Christmas Eve and it is offering shipping options up until Dec. 23. Toys R Us stores are open around the clock from the morning of Dec. 23 through 9 p.m. Christmas Eve; it also is extending its hours in the days preceding. And many retailers, such as Best Buy, allow shoppers to find an item online and pick it up at a store. Even 7-Eleven is targeting shoppers, offering gift cards, toys and stocking stuffers in its stores. The bottom line: Take advantage of those last-minute discounts and other deals. — DO YOUR HOMEWORK: Marshal Cohen, chief industry analyst at market researcher NPD Group, says many people do not yet know what they want to give, or get. "These consumers are the ones who put themselves in a stressful situation," he said. "The one saving grace is online (shopping) is a chance for a lot of people to do their homework." He said shoppers can narrow down their options ahead of time by looking online. You can also check Amazon.com to see if the person has a wish list you didn't know about, or study Facebook or Pinterest pages for ideas. Such prep work can save a lot of headaches and potentially limit last-minute impulse purchases that can prove costly. — WEAR COMFORTABLE SHOES: Seriously, this is a common-sense step many shoppers skip. "Wear comfortable shoes for goodness sake," Cohen said. "It (shopping) is exercise and it's not very comfortable." Don't waste time cruising to find the closest spot to the store either, he said. Those comfortable shoes will make it easier to just park and walk.

  • Haggen chain buying 146 Safeway, Albertsons stores

    BELLINGHAM, Wash. (AP) — No Albertsons or Safeway stores in the Northwest Valley are in line to be sold following an announcement by Washington state-based grocery chain Haggen Inc. that it plans to buy 146 Albertsons and Safeway stores in Arizona, Washington, Oregon, California and Nevada.The list includes two Safeway stores in Tucson and one in Anthem. No Albertson’s in Arizona are listed, according to Haggen, Inc.The Bellingham Herald reported the sales are required under the federal review of Safeway's sale to an investment group that owns Albertsons.If Haggen's plans announced Friday get Federal Trade Commission approval, the Bellingham-based company would expand from 18 stores and 16 pharmacies in the Northwest to 164 stores and 106 pharmacies in the five states.Details of the deal haven't been released.This is the largest of several sales related to the $7.6 billion sale of Safeway to investors led by Cerberus Capital Management. Associated Food Stores is buying eight stores in Montana and Wyoming, Associated Wholesale Grocers is purchasing 12 stores in Texas, and Supervalu is buying two Albertsons stores in Everett and Woodinville, Washington.

  • Larry H. Miller joins MADD's 'Tie One On for Safety' campaign

    Larry H. Miller Dealerships has announced a partnership with Mother’s Against Drunk Driving Arizona to help raise awareness around the organization’s “Tie One On for Safety” campaign, which encourages drivers to tie a red ribbon on their car as a reminder to always designate a non-drinking driver.In addition, through Larry H. Miller Charities, the dealership group’s charitable arm, the company will match customer and community donations up to $20,000.“Every 51 minutes, on average, an individual is killed in a drunk driving crash and Thanksgiving through New Year’s Eve is the nation’s most dangerous time of the year for car accidents,” said Nick Ray, state executive director of MADD Arizona.“During this past Thanksgiving weekend alone, DUI task forces in Arizona made 372 DUI arrests.”These staggering statistics have prompted LHM Dealerships, an organization that focuses on giving back to the communities it does business in, to partner with MADD to encourage responsible driving during the holiday season and throughout the year.Through Jan. 1, all 13 LHM Dealerships locations in Arizona will match customers’ donations to the campaign up to $20,000.

Featured columns

  • Lead with hips for correct follow-through

    In general, things that you do after you hit your shot are unimportant to the outcome of the shot. You cannot “save” the shot after you have hit it. Interestingly, we try.How many times have you seen someone hit a shot offline and then lean in the opposite direction as if to try to “bring it back?” Even on the pro tour, the player will hit a shot and then hold his hands in a particular way to try to “undo” the damage he did at impact when he hit the ball.For the most part, I don’t tell my students to try to finish in a particular way because I find that if there is a problem with their follow-through, they tend to continue to make the mistake and then, after the mistake is made, they will strike the pose I want. That doesn’t help.Having said all that, what you do after impact does indicate what has gone before. In that sense, the follow-through is important in that it indicates if the technique used in the downswing was correct.So here’s the ideal: You want to finish on your left leg facing the target after you swing. Here are the two prerequisites to make that happen: Don’t sway off the ball in the backswing and bring the club butt-end first into the ball in the downswing. If you stay centered over the ball in the backswing and if you bring the club end-on into the hitting area, you will finish on your left side facing the target. The finish is an indication of what has gone before.How do you learn not to sway off the ball? Assume your address position with the sun at your back and the shadow of your head over a ball sitting on the ground. Take your backswing and see what happens to the shadow of your head relative to the ball. If you are like most golfers, the shadow of your head will move off the ball toward the rear. Continue working with your shadow and the ball until you can keep the shadow of your head over the ball. Be very sensitive to the feelings in your body that develop as you strive to keep the shadow of your head over the ball. Those feelings are what you want to strive for when you are hitting balls.

  • Valley man says Social Security ‘killed’ his mom

    A Valley man is working to prove that his mother is still alive.Bob of Phoenix says the confusion started when his mom Harriet did not get her monthly Social Security payment.He says the representative on the phone told him the Social Security Administration received a death certificate from a mortuary telling them his mother had died weeks earlier.“I say if that’s the case then she’s the first resurrected person in over 2,000 years because she’s standing right beside me in the flesh,” said Bob.They set an appointment for weeks in the future but his mom would have been nearly two months without benefits, so he let me know.Mistaken death reports are uncommon, but they do happen.

  • Angry outbursts frustrate caregiver

    Editor’s note: This is the latest in a series of advice columns from Benevilla’s caregiver coach, Regina Thibideau.Dear Caregiver Coach: I am at my wit’s end. My husband has FTLD and has outbursts of anger which I don’t understand. What can I do? At Wit’s EndDear At Wit’s End: Thank you for bringing up a serious problem for many caregivers whose loved one has dementia and more specifically Frontotemporal Lobe Dementia, which is often called FTD or FTLD.This particular dementia is characterized by two specific issues: changes in behavior and problems with language.Beyond that, outbursts and behavior issues can occur when pain is present.When someone cannot tell you in words about pain, often they will act out in ways that seem more angry and combative.

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Glendale Police Teach DUI Enforcement to Students

Glendale Police team up with the Law Enforcement Club at Ironwood High School to teach student...

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