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  • Free class explores retirement income

    Surprise will host a free class on how to optimize income in retirement.The session is scheduled from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Oct. 22 in the Public Safety Building (Police Department), 14250 W. Statler Plaza.Participants will learn how to position their portfolios to take advantage of tax-saving strategies and minimize exposure to market volatility.The instructors will be Mark Melkowski and Robert Feinholz with the American Financial Education Alliance.For information or registration, call Ruby Sitea at 623-222-3242 or send an email to ruby.sitea@surpriseaz.gov.

  • Surprise collects hazardous waste

    Surprise residents with old paint cans, car batteries or lawn chemicals piling up in the garage are encouraged to drop off these items at the city’s household hazardous waste collection event.The event is only for Surprise residents and will be from 8 a.m. to noon Oct. 11 in the Public Works Maintenance Yard, 13433 W. Foxfire Drive.To get to the dropoff location from Bell Road, turn north on Dysart Road and follow signs to the entrance off Foxfire Road.Proof of residency will be required of participants.Items should be sealed in their original containers or clearly label all items not in their original containers and place in a cardboard box.Participants should remain in their vehicles. Event staff will remove materials from each vehicle.

  • Brelby Theatre scares up ‘Things That Go BUMP in the Night’

    Downtown Glendale’s Brelby Theatre Company will bring plenty of thrills and chills in “Things That Go BUMP in the Night!” at 7 p.m. Oct. 27 at the Velma Teague Branch Library, 7010 N. 58th Ave.Appropriate for both adults and teens, this performance of spooky scenes, songs and monologues will help set the mood for the season.“Brelby is thrilled to be partnering with the Velma Teague Library to present a medley of Halloween favorites for the Glendale community,” said Shelby Maticic, Brelby’s artistic director.Recognized in a 2012 “Best of the Valley” feature by “Phoenix Magazine,” Brelby Theatre Company is the brainchild of Brian and Shelby Maticic. Founded in 2009, Brelby found a home in 2012 in a new theater space across the street from the Velma Teague Library. They’ve recently produced several sold-out hits, including “She Kills Monsters” and “Little Shop of Horrors,” and offer acting classes for all ages through Glendale’s Parks and Recreation Division.For information on Brelby Theatre Company, including upcoming plays, visit brelby.com. The program is free. No registration is required. For information on the event, call 623-930-3431.

  • Effect of Prop. 122 depends upon whom you ask

    The open governor’s race is grabbing most of the attention in the run-up to the Nov. 4 general election, but there are ballot measures to consider as well, measures that could have a similarly lasting impact on Arizona’s future.One of those ballot measures is Proposition 122, and explanations of what it does differ depending on who you ask. Supporters like Clint Bolick, director of the Goldwater Institute’s Scharf-Norton Center for Constitutional Litigation, said Prop. 122 is intended to combat federal overreach.“The federal government repeatedly passes laws and imposes regulations but looks to the states and their taxpayers to pick up the tab,” he said. “Prop. 122 creates a mechanism to allow Arizona voters and our elected representatives to prevent the federal government from high-jacking state resources and substituting their priorities for ours.”Bolick also said there is at least one example of how Prop. 122 could be applied playing out right now.“The Environmental Protection Agency is creating regulations that will allow it to regulate more private property in Arizona by expansively defining water to include dry land,” he said. “The federal government does not have the power under the Constitution to regulate non-navigable waters that do not cross state boundaries.“If the regulations are adopted, of course Arizona can challenge them in court,” he continued. “But under Prop. 122, if the Legislature or voters agree that the EPA has exceeded its authority, we can prevent state resources from being used to implement the EPA regulations. This would have a huge impact in protecting the property rights of Arizonans, and is only one example among many.”

  • Free bra fittings raise funds, awareness for Komen

    Join Wacoal in its mission to help end breast cancer with Fit for the Cure.Participate in a Fit for the Cure event and receive a complimentary bra fitting from a Wacoal fit specialist.Fittings will be conducted: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 2 at Macy's Arrowhead Towne Center, 7600 W. Arrowhead Towne Center, Glendale. Phone: 623-979-7900; and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 3 at Macy’s Fashion Square, 7014 E. Camelback Road, Scottsdale. Phone: 480-840-0333. For every woman who participates, Wacoal will donate $2 to Susan G. Komen for breast cancer research and community health programs. Wacoal will also donate an additional $2 for every Wacoal bra, shapewear piece or b.tempt’d bra purchased at these events.For nearly 15 years, Wacoal has swept the nation educating and fitting more than 604,000 women across 411 cities about the importance of bra fit, foundation and overall breast health. To date, through Fit for the Cure, Wacoal has donated nearly $4 million to Susan G. Komen.

  • ASU professor visits Sun City West

    The Valley Engineering, Science & Technology Club will discuss cities of tomorrow at its next meeting, scheduled 11:30 a.m. Friday in Briarwood Country Club, 20800 N. 135th Ave., Sun City West.Matei Georgescu, Arizona State University assistant professor, will discuss “Environmental Impacts of Large Scale Urbanization.”The talk will present numerical modeling results of environmental tradeoffs of new unique building adaptations.The new options of these features are prioritized into strategies that can shape cities of tomorrow.The Valley Engineering, Science & Technology Club is an organization of retired and active engineers and scientists.  Persons with interest and past ties in the engineering and scientific areas, including spouses, are welcome.Luncheon meetings are at 11:30 a.m. on the first Friday of each month, October through June, at Briarwood Country Club.

  • Camera coverage denied in Bullhead City case

    KINGMAN, Ariz. (AP) — A judge is refusing to allow video and photographic cameras in the courtroom during proceedings in the case of a Bullhead City man charged in the disappearance and death of an 8-year-old girl. Judge Lee Jantzen of Mohave County Superior Court on Tuesday rejected news outlets' request to allow camera coverage of the case of Justin James Rector. Rector has pleaded not guilty to charges of first-degree murder, kidnapping, child abuse and abandonment of a body in the death and disappearance of Isabella "Bella" Grogan-Cannella. Her partially clothed body was found Sept. 3, a day after she was reported missing from her Bullhead City home. Jantzen ruled that allowing cameras would affect the ability to find a fair and impartial jury panel and that logistics of the courtroom in Kingman would make it difficult for the media to avoid showing jurors or juvenile witnesses. Additionally, the judge cited concern for the dignity of the proceedings. "People act differently" when cameras are present, the judge said. Attorney Monica Limon-Wynn, representing KVVU-TV of Las Vegas, argued that allowing cameras would keep the public informed. She said one camera could be shared by multiple stations. Prosecutor Greg McPhillips and defense attorney Harry Moore opposed allowing cameras. McPhillips said it would be difficult to seat a jury if photographs and video footage of the trial were allowed, while Moore said cameras would incite public sentiment against his client and deprive him of his right to a fair trial.

  • Jury selection resumes in Jodi Arias retrial

    PHOENIX (AP) — Jury selection resumed Wednesday in the penalty retrial of convicted murderer Jodi Arias as prosecutors try again for a death sentence. Roughly a third of 300 potential jurors were dismissed Monday after telling the judge they had seen too much media coverage of her first trial to be impartial or had already made up their minds about her punishment. An additional 100 prospective jurors were called in Wednesday before attorneys begin the process of whittling down the group further using questionnaires each potential panelist is asked to complete. Arias was convicted of murder last year in the 2008 killing of ex-boyfriend Travis Alexander at his suburban Phoenix home, but jurors couldn't agree on a sentence. Prosecutors have one more shot with the new jury to secure the death penalty, otherwise Arias faces life in prison. The retrial is expected to last into December. Prosecutors declined to comment on Wednesday. The judge has previously denied numerous motions by the defense to dismiss the death penalty as an option. A hearing is set for mid-October for arguments over yet another similar motion. The judge also has repeatedly denied defense motions to move the trial out of Phoenix and to sequester the jury. Such a flurry of motions by defense attorneys in the days leading up to a trial is common, particularly in death penalty cases, as lawyers works to build grounds for appeal should their client receive the ultimate punishment.

  • Ebola patient told hospital he was from Liberia

    DALLAS (AP) — The first Ebola patient diagnosed in the U.S. initially went to a Dallas emergency room last week but was sent home, even after telling a nurse that he had been in disease-ravaged West Africa, the hospital acknowledged Wednesday. The decision by Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital to release him could have put many others at risk of exposure to the disease before he went back to the ER two days later, after his condition worsened. Thomas Eric Duncan explained to a nurse Friday that he was visiting the U.S. from Liberia, but that information was not widely shared, said Dr. Mark Lester, who works for the hospital's parent company. Duncan's answer "was not fully communicated" throughout the hospital's medical team, Lester said. Instead, the patient was sent home with antibiotics, according to his sister, Mai Wureh, who identified her brother as the infected man in an interview with The Associated Press. A day after the man's diagnosis was confirmed, a nine-member team of federal health officials was tracking anyone who had close contact with him. The team from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was in Dallas to work with local and state health agencies to ensure that those people are watched every day for 21 days. "If anyone develops fever, we'll immediately isolate them to stop the chain of transmission," Dr. Tom Frieden, the CDC director, said in an interview. Duncan has been kept in isolation at the hospital since Sunday. He was listed in serious but stable condition. Ebola is believed to have sickened more than 6,500 people in West Africa, and more than 3,000 deaths have been linked to the disease, according to the World Health Organization. Officials are monitoring 12 to 18 people who may have been exposed to the man, including three members of the ambulance crew that transported him to the hospital and five schoolchildren. Some of the people are members of his family, but not all, Dallas city spokeswoman Sana Syed said. The ambulance crew tested negative for the virus and was restricted to home while their conditions are observed. The children, who attend four separate schools, apparently had contact with the man over the weekend and then returned to classes this week. But school officials have said they showed no symptoms. Ebola symptoms can include fever, muscle pain, vomiting and bleeding, and can appear as long as 21 days after exposure to the virus. The disease is not contagious until symptoms begin, and it takes close contact with bodily fluids to spread. Officials said there are no other suspected cases in Texas, but the diagnosis sent anxiety through the area's West African community, whose leaders urged caution to prevent spreading the virus. The man left Liberia on Sept. 19, arrived the next day to visit relatives and started feeling ill four or five days later, Frieden said. Stanley Gaye, president of the Liberian Community Association of Dallas-Fort Worth, said the 10,000-strong Liberian population in North Texas is skeptical of the CDC's assurances because Ebola has ravaged their country. "We've been telling people to try to stay away from social gatherings," Gaye said Tuesday at a community meeting. The CDC has not advised that people avoid large gatherings in this country. The association's vice president warned against alarm in the community. "We don't want to get a panic going," said vice president Roseline Sayon. "We embrace those people who are coming forward. Don't let the stigma keep you from getting tested." Frieden said he did not believe anyone on the same flights as the patient was at risk. The man traveled from his home in the Liberian capital of Monrovia to Brussels and then to Dallas, according to a spokeswoman for the Belgium health ministry, Vinciane Charlier. "Ebola doesn't spread before someone gets sick, and he didn't get sick until four days after he got off the airplane," Frieden said. Four American aid workers who became infected in West Africa have been flown back to the U.S. for treatment after they became sick. They were treated in special isolation facilities at hospitals in Atlanta and Nebraska. Three have recovered. A U.S. doctor exposed to the virus in Sierra Leone is under observation in a similar facility at the National Institutes of Health. The U.S. has only four such isolation units, but Frieden said there was no need to move the latest patient because virtually any hospital can provide the proper care and infection control. Passengers leaving Liberia pass through rigorous screening, the country's airport authority said Wednesday. But those checks are no guarantee that an infected person won't get through and airport officials would be unlikely to stop someone not showing symptoms, according to Binyah Kesselly, chairman of the Liberia Airport Authority's board of directors. CDC officials are helping staff at Monrovia's airport, where passengers are screened for signs of infection, including fever, and asked about their travel history. Plastic buckets filled with chlorinated water for hand-washing are present throughout the airport. Liberia is one of the three hardest-hit countries in the epidemic, along with Sierra Leone and Guinea. ___ Neergaard reported from Washington. Associated Press writers Nomaan Merchant in Dallas and Emily Schmall in Fort Worth; Jonathan Paye-Layleh in Monrovia, Liberia; Francis Kokutse in Accra, Ghana, and Matt Small of AP Radio, contributed to this report.

  • Financial adviser opens Peoria location

    Fullerton Financial Planning has opened a new location at 14155 N. 83rd Ave., Suite 144, Peoria.Stephanie Fullerton is the founder and president of Fullerton Financial Planning.She has reported annual sales of more than $20 million and advised more than 650 clients throughout the Valley and Prescott.Fullerton has been named one of Arizona’s Top 100 Business women for the last six years by Arizona Women Magazine.In 2011, she was named as one of the top five advisers in the country by Senior Market Advisors magazine.She also has been featured as a regular guest on local television and is featured weekly on KTAR and KFNX’s “Financial Safari” radio program.

  • Secret Service chief resigns after security lapses

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Secret Service Director Julia Pierson resigned Wednesday, a day after bitingly critical questioning by Congress about a White House security breach. There had been increasing calls for her departure during the day. Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson said she offered her resignation and he accepted it. Pierson will be replaced by Joseph Clancy, a former special agent in charge of the president's protective detail who retired in 2011. Pierson has been with the agency for 30 years. She was widely criticized during and after her testimony Tuesday. Pierson took over the embattled agency last year after embarrassing incidents involving misconduct by officers and agents, including the 2012 Colombia prostitution scandal.

  • Medicare open enrollment looms

    Medicare beneficiaries who want to make changes to their prescription drug plans or Medicare Advantage coverage can do so starting Oct. 15 during the program’s annual open enrollment period.There will be somewhat fewer plans to pick from this year, but in general people will have plenty of options, experts say.And although premiums aren’t expected to rise markedly overall in 2015 — and in some cases may actually decline — some individual plans have signaled significantly higher rates.Rather than rely on the sticker price of a plan alone, experts say it’s critical that beneficiaries compare the available options in their area to make sure they’re in the plan that covers the drugs and doctors they need at the best price.The annual open enrollment period is also a once-a-year opportunity to switch to a private Medicare Advantage plan from the traditional Medicare fee-for-service plan or vice versa. Open enrollment ends Dec. 7.Although the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has released some specifics about 2015 premiums and plans, many details about provider networks, drug formularies and the like won’t be available until later this fall.

Trips to mound limited in Arizona experiment

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  • Brelby Theatre scares up ‘Things That Go BUMP in the Night’

    Downtown Glendale’s Brelby Theatre Company will bring plenty of thrills and chills in “Things That Go BUMP in the Night!” at 7 p.m. Oct. 27 at the Velma Teague Branch Library, 7010 N. 58th Ave.Appropriate for both adults and teens, this performance of spooky scenes, songs and monologues will help set the mood for the season.“Brelby is thrilled to be partnering with the Velma Teague Library to present a medley of Halloween favorites for the Glendale community,” said Shelby Maticic, Brelby’s artistic director.Recognized in a 2012 “Best of the Valley” feature by “Phoenix Magazine,” Brelby Theatre Company is the brainchild of Brian and Shelby Maticic. Founded in 2009, Brelby found a home in 2012 in a new theater space across the street from the Velma Teague Library. They’ve recently produced several sold-out hits, including “She Kills Monsters” and “Little Shop of Horrors,” and offer acting classes for all ages through Glendale’s Parks and Recreation Division.For information on Brelby Theatre Company, including upcoming plays, visit brelby.com. The program is free. No registration is required. For information on the event, call 623-930-3431.

  • West Valley Symphony celebrates 46th season

    The West Valley Symphony, led by Maestro Cal Stewart Kellogg, will present its five-concert series at Valley Vista Performing Arts Center in Surprise.  “At the request of our many long-time patrons, we are moving from general admission to assigned seating for our 2014-2015, 46th season,” said President Catherine Leas. “Our ticket sales will be handled by the Arizona Broadway Theatre prior to concert Sundays, and on concert Sundays after 2 p.m., the Valley Vista Performing Arts Center Box Office will handle ticket sales and will calls. Special thanks goes to (Surprise Today’s sister paper) the Daily-News Sun, our platinum media sponsor, and to Sun Health Services, our playbill printing sponsor. These organizations, our concert sponsors and individual donors all believe deeply in the power of a vibrant arts community accessible to all.”The orchestra returns to the stage on Nov. 2 with Great Early Romantics, three selections from the first half of the 19th century. After the rousing overture to von Weber’s opera “Euryanthe,” guest artist Katherine McLin will perform the “Concerto for Violin in E minor” by Felix Mendelssohn. Also featured on this program is the powerful and majestic “Symphony No. 5 in C minor” by Beethoven. Concert sponsored by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona Advantage. Guest artist sponsored by the Barbara and Jonas Lashmet Family Fund.Gather your family and friends for the very special Dec. 21 Holiday Season Concert, including holiday favorites as well as the conducting debut of Keith Morrow, winner of the “be a conductor” live auction item at the fundraiser held last April. Also planned is a portion of the program to be performed side-by-side with the West Valley Youth Orchestra. In honor of Helene Gumina, a long-time West Valley Symphony supporter, this concert is sponsored by the Barbara and Jonas Lashmet Family Fund.Kellogg has a soft spot in his heart for Italy. After studying and beginning his career there, he continued to live in Rome for almost 20 years. The first part of this Jan. 18, Going Places program reflects his fond memories of both that wonderful country and the Eternal City.One would be hard-pressed to find a destination farther away from the day-to-day grind than a trip to the planets. Gustav Holst offers this musical journey, and Jeffrey C. Hall, director of the Lowell Observatory, has a visual interpretation of this score. Concert sponsored by Jerry Look, financial adviser, Edward Jones.

  • Phoenix: Music in the Garden

    Friday-Nov. 21: The Desert Botanical Gardens is featuring a variety of musical talents for the Fall Music in the Garden series each Friday. Enjoy performances from local bands at the Ullman Terrace stage. In case of inclement weather, concerts will be at Dorrance Hall. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., concerts begin at 7 p.m. Plan ahead and enjoy dinner at Gertrude’s, the garden’s restaurant or enjoy the following options at Ullman Terrace: Patio Cafe, chef-attended station, full cash bar and boutique wine sales. Groups that will perform are Flamenco Po La Vida, Bad Cactus Brass Band, Turning Point, Sugar Thieves, Tro De Mambo, the Mike Elread Trio, the Dmitri Matheny Group and Big Nick and the Gila Monsters. Cost for the each concert is $20 for members and $25 for the general public. Group rates are available for parties of 10 or more adults by calling 480-481-8104. You must be 21 to attend. For information visit www.dbg.org.

  • Financial adviser opens Peoria location

    Fullerton Financial Planning has opened a new location at 14155 N. 83rd Ave., Suite 144, Peoria.Stephanie Fullerton is the founder and president of Fullerton Financial Planning.She has reported annual sales of more than $20 million and advised more than 650 clients throughout the Valley and Prescott.Fullerton has been named one of Arizona’s Top 100 Business women for the last six years by Arizona Women Magazine.In 2011, she was named as one of the top five advisers in the country by Senior Market Advisors magazine.She also has been featured as a regular guest on local television and is featured weekly on KTAR and KFNX’s “Financial Safari” radio program.

  • What's PayPal's first solo move?

    NEW YORK (AP) — PayPal's impending split from long-time partner eBay Inc. will ratchet up its appeal to online retail competitors such as Amazon.com and give it the freedom to aggressively take on new mobile pay challenger Apple Pay. For eBay, the challenge will be how to drive revenue without its fastest-growing division. The move marks a 180-degree turn for eBay Inc. CEO John Donahoe, who had been adamant in spurning activist investor Carl Icahn's call months ago to spin off PayPal. Donahoe, who will step down after the split is finalized in the second half of next year, said he now agrees that it's the right path for both companies. With the launch of Apple Pay next month expected to reshape the mobile payments industry, Icahn said he's "happy" eBay came around, "perhaps a little later than they should have, but earlier than we expected." Investors were happy too, sending eBay shares up more than 7 percent to close at $56.63 Tuesday. PayPal services $1 of every $6 dollars spent online. It collects fees from over 150 million users who use the online service to send money to other users and pay for goods and services in more than 200 markets. Acquired by eBay in 2002 for $1.3 billion, its partnership with the popular site helped expand PayPal's reach worldwide. The service posted 20 percent revenue growth in the last quarter to $1.95 billion — representing nearly half of eBay's total revenue. PayPal also has staked a claim in the small but swiftly-growing mobile payment arena, and is on track to process 1 billion mobile payments this year. It launched PayPal Here and acquired Braintree and its One Touch mobile payment service, which compete with players such as Square and Google Wallet. The payoff is huge for whichever player can own the space: mobile payments could spike to $58.4 billion by 2017 from just $1 billion last year, Citi Investment Research analyst Mark May said in August. And the pressure is on. Apple Inc., which has 800 million user accounts through iTunes, threw down a gauntlet last month with the announcement of its own digital wallet Apple Pay, slated to launch in October. So what might be PayPal's first solo move? Courting major eBay competitors such as Amazon.com Inc. and newly public Alibaba, who might be more likely to partner with PayPal now that it's not married to a direct competitor, says Cantor Fitzgerald analyst Youssef Squali. The company also could be a takeover target. Squali notes that Google and Microsoft (not to mention Visa and Mastercard), have tried to build online payment platforms with varying degrees of success. And with PayPal "now essentially free to focus on payment innovation, and standing on the shoulders of a well-capitalized eBay, they can act more aggressively to counter new competitors," says R.W. Baird analyst Colin Sebastian. He notes that PayPal will end up with a sizable amount of cash and none of eBay's debt. In a statement, Icahn asserted that PayPal either needs to buy other digital payment services or consider selling itself to another "strong player" to prepare for an industry shakeout that he believes will happen soon. "In light of the development of strong competition such as the advent of Apple Pay, the sooner these consolidations take place, the better," Icahn said. New CEO Dan Schulman will bring both mobile and prepaid payment experience to the company. Schulman, 56, was founding CEO of Virgin Mobile, before leading the prepaid group at Sprint Nextel and most recently expanding mobile and online pay services at American Express. Citi's May noted that few people have that background in financial services, mobile technology and payments — three key strengths to be competitive going forward in digital payments. The benefits of the move for eBay are less clear. The San Jose, California, company was plagued this year with a data breach and an algorithm change at Google that led to fewer hits from the search engine. In its most recent quarter, core marketplaces revenue rose just 9 percent to $2.17 billion, versus a 20 percent jump in payments revenue. Devin Wenig, currently president of eBay Marketplaces, will become CEO of the new eBay Inc., leading both the marketplaces and enterprise divisions.

  • Investors should heed iron rules of money

    No matter who you are, how much you earn or how you invest, a few truths apply to you and your money.• Spending money to show people how much money you have is the surest way to have less money.Singer Rihanna earns tens of millions of dollars, but found herself “effectively bankrupt” in 2009. She sued her financial adviser for not doing his job. He offered a legendary response: “Was it really necessary to tell her that if you spend money on things, you will end up with the things and not the money?”The first iron rule of money is that wealth is the stuff you don’t see. It’s the cars not purchased, the clothes not bought, the jewelry forgone. Money buys things, but wealth — assets such as cash, stocks, bonds, in the bank, unspent — buys freedom and security. Pick which one you want wisely.• Wealth is completely relative.According to World Bank economist Branko Milanovic, “the poorest (5 percent) of Americans are better off than more than two-thirds of the world population.” Furthermore, “only about 3 percent of the Indian population have incomes higher than the bottom (the very poorest) U.S. percentile.” And those figures are adjusted for differences in cost of living.

Featured columns

  • OPINION: Native American women enrich all aspects of U.S. life

    Geronimo, Sitting Bull, Tecumseh, and even Tonto — every little boy, with a feather in his hair and arrow pointed at an imaginary buffalo, knows these names.But how many little girls know these — Dahtestel, Cuhtahlatah, Eagle of Delight, or even Sacajawea or Pocahontas? Yet these Native Americans — women — were significant contributors to the extraordinary transition of America from the “wild west” to the contemporary, sophisticated society we enjoy today. The lore of past years is filled with the legendary presence of Native American women who persistently, courageously and, usually anonymously, added significantly to this heritage.The assistance of Pocahontas (Powhatan 1585-1617) to Captain John Smith was crucial to the founding of Jamestown. Her marriage to prosperous wealthy tobacco farmer, John Rolfe, brought several critical years of peace between the English and the Indians. And one certainly wonders how successful the historic treks through the Northwest territories by Lewis and Clark would have been without the language skills and extensive wilderness experience of Sacajawea. (Shoshane 1790-1812)Tyonajanean (Oneida), fought beside her Army officer husband at the battle of Oriskany (1775-1783). She enabled him to continue fighting by loading his weapon after he was wounded. Dahteste (Apache) negotiated the surrender of Geronimo, and Eagle of Delight (Oto) accompanied the delegation of chiefs to Washington D.C. for an important meeting with James Monroe, then president of the United States.The contribution of Indian women continues. Contemporary names are regularly being added to those who have blazed the path before them. Among these are Wilma Mankiller (Cherokee) first woman in modern history to lead a major tribe; Anna Prieto-Sandoval (Sycuan) led her tribe from abject poverty to being the national model of tribal self-sufficiency; Ada E. Deer (Menomonee) first woman to hold the seat of Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs (1993); Buffy Saint-Marie (Cree) Oscar winner in music for the film, “Officer and a Gentleman”; and Marie Tall Chief, first American prima-ballerina and founder of the Chicago City Ballet. Most recently, we celebrate the achievement of Diane Humetewa (Hopi) as the first female Native American to be appointed a federal judge!The president of Antioch University, Cassanra Mennelito Kerkvliet, proudly claims her Dine heritage. Dr. Eloisa Garcia Tamez (Apache) continues her challenges relative to sovereignty in indigenous lands; and Naomi Lang (Karuk), along with her Russian partner, repeatedly re-sets the standard for Pairs Figure Skating at every level of competition.

  • Consider an autumn leaf-peeping trip

    From pumpkin spice lattes to football season, it’s official: Autumn is upon us.Each fall, trees across the United States, including Arizona, put on a brilliant show of color ranging from dazzling reds to brilliant oranges and vibrant yellows. This fall, why not embrace all that autumn has to offer by taking a scenic drive?AAA Travel experts recommend the following three routes that offer some of the most beautiful fall scenery Arizona has to offer this time of year:• Around the Peaks LoopThis scenic drive is located in the Coconino National Forest in the San Francisco Peaks. It winds through pine forests, aspen groves and around Arizona’s highest mountain, Humphreys Peak. There are numerous spots to stop along the way for a hike, picnic, sightsee and set up camp. It takes about two hours to complete the loop, not including the drive time from Phoenix.• Kaibab Plateau-North Rim Parkway

  • OPINION: GOP needs Walker to prevail in Wisconsin

    Of course it’s important which party controls the House and Senate. But for Republicans concerned about the party’s 2016 presidential prospects, one key race this November isn’t for control of Capitol Hill. It is, somewhat improbably, the fight for governor of Wisconsin.Democrats have been gunning for incumbent Gov. Scott Walker since he and the Republican-controlled state Legislature passed Act 10 — a measure curbing the collective bargaining powers of some public workers — forcing them to contribute more for their health care and pensions, and ending the automatic collection of union dues.It’s hard to remember the incredible intensity that surrounded passage of Act 10 three years ago. Democratic lawmakers fled the state rather than allow a vote on it. Protesters took over the state Capitol. There was an ugly Supreme Court fight. But it became the law.In the years since, Act 10 has been very good for the state budget. The measure has saved the state somewhere between $2 billion and $3 billion, mostly in pension costs.On the other hand, Act 10 has been very bad for public-sector unions. “We’ve lost 70 percent of our membership in the state,” Lee Saunders, president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, told The Washington Post recently. Teachers’ unions have also been hit hard.Walker’s law is the most devastating blow ever struck to union domination of public services. It is probably not an exaggeration to say that revenge-seeking organized labor will pursue Walker to the grave, and perhaps beyond. This year, AFSCME, the AFL-CIO and others will spend tens of millions, perhaps more than $100 million, in an effort to unseat him in favor of Democrat Mary Burke.

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Sun City West Library "Yarn Bombing" Timelapse

The Mac-Cro-Knit Club of Sun City West set up a surprise "yarn bombing" at the RH Johnson Libr...

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