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  • Things are lookin’ up in Glendale

    A night under the stars is on the horizon.The 37th Saguaro Astronomy Club Annual Fall Public Star Party will be from 6 to 9:30 p.m. Oct. 4 at Thunderbird Conservation Park, 67th Avenue and Patrick Lane in Glendale. Sunset will take place at approximately 6:09 p.m.Weather permitting, this free, family-friendly event will be sponsored by the Glendale Parks and Recreation Department and hosted by the Saguaro Astronomy Club. Large and small telescopes will be set up and available for public viewing of the moon, planets, stars, galaxies and other deep sky wonders.For more information, visit the Saguaro Astronomy Club website at http://saguaroastro.org.For more information on Thunderbird Conservation Park, visit www.glendaleaz.com/parksandrecreation.

  • Sun City Fire gets helping hand from Guys in Blue

    The Valley Honda Dealers are “helping the helpful” throughout September by sending the Helpful Guys in Blue to various fire stations throughout Arizona to deliver a Random Act of Helpfulness by bringing complimentary lunches to our hardworking firefighters.The Guys in Blue visited Sun City Fire Station No. 133 at 13013 N. 111th Ave., Sun City, Station No. 132, 11401 N. 99th Ave., Sun City, and Station No. 131, 17017 N. 99th Ave., Sun City on Sept. 5 to show their thanks on behalf of the Valley Honda Dealers.

  • Teen dodgeball tournament this Saturday in Surprise

    Surprise is hosting a dodgeball tournament for teens 13-17 years old on Saturday 20 from 5-9 p.m. at Countryside Recreation Center, 15038 N. Parkview Place.Teams of six to eight players can play for the chance to be named “Dodgeball Champions” and win prizes. If you don’t have a team, don’t worry – you can be placed on a “free agent” team the day of the tournament. Each team will play a minimum of three games. Players must be on site at 5 p.m. to register. Admission is $5 per person, which includes pizza and a drink.For information, visit www.surpriseaz.gov/theteenspot or call 623-222-2251.

  • Lord of Life honors charter members

    The celebration was in full swing on Aug. 24 when Lord of Life Lutheran Church honored charter members of the Sun City West church, which was founded in 1981.Thirteen charter members remain from the initial 161 and it was time to gather and listen to their stories about those long ago days.The church had a reception and catered meal for the charter members following Sunday worship.Pastor Stephen Beyer put together a DVD highlighting the stories of the 13 special guests.Interviews with these first members were recorded and included in the presentation to make sure their stories would be saved for all time.Photos of them with shovels in hand turning over those first bits of soil and traipsing through the sanctuary while it was under construction were part of the show as well.  

  • Surprise hosts free movie

    The City of Surprise and Coulter Nissan of Surprise present Movie Night at Surprise Stadium at 7 p.m. Sept. 27.“Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2” is rated PG.Participants should bring blankets and pillows, stretch out on the stadium grass and enjoy the free movie. Gates will open at 6 p.m.Surprise Stadium is located at 15850 N. Bullard Ave.For information, call 623-222-2000.

  • Glendale reopens hiking trails, other facilities closed by Sept. 8 storm

    GLENDALE, Ariz. – The city has reopened several hiking trails and other sites closed since heavy rain and flooding Sept. 8, officials announced Wednesday.The following parks are reopened and available for use:· Skunk Creek, Thunderbird Paseo and Grand Canal Linear trails are all open to the public. Sections of the path system have sinkholes, and extreme wash out has been secured for public safety. Additional work was done to fortify the barricades and close the isolated areas of sinkholes and extreme erosion along the side of the trail system.· Thunderbird Conservation Park’s hiking trails are now open to the public except for extreme washout and erosion in one section of Arrowhead Point Trail (from ramada 15 to the top of elevation).

  • After record profits, airlines keep adding jobs

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of jobs at U.S. airlines keeps growing — although slowly — as some of them post record profits. The U.S. Department of Transportation said Thursday that the nation's passenger airlines employed the equivalent of 386,243 full-time workers in July, up 1.3 percent from the same month last year. It was the eighth straight monthly gain over year-earlier numbers. The largest employer, United Airlines, cut its work force 3.3 percent, while Delta, American, Southwest and US Airways added jobs. Two small, low-cost carriers, Spirit and Allegiant, had double-digit gains. Some regional airlines that operate shorter flights for major carriers cut jobs, including Envoy (American) and Endeavor (Delta), while others grew. The government counts two part-time employees as one full-time worker. Government bulletin: http://bit.ly/1qO0qsK

  • Police chase suspects' vehicle to Phoenix airport

    PHOENIX (AP) — Flights now are grounded, and the busiest terminal at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport remains on lockdown as authorities search for a suspect in a shooting at a Tempe gasoline station. Authorities have detained two suspects and are searching for a third who may be in Terminal 4's parking garage. Phoenix police say it's unclear if the remaining suspect is armed. Hundreds of officers are searching the garage and terminal. Tempe police chased the suspects' vehicle into Phoenix on Thursday afternoon. The suspects bailed out of the car at Sky Harbor following a high-speed chase and two were apprehended. Police say a man was shot at a Shell station about 2:45 p.m. There's no immediate word on the victim's condition. Police didn't immediately provide a possible motive for the shooting.

  • Rimrock man fined for cutting 207-year-old tree

    FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — A Rimrock man will have to pay the U.S. Forest Service $3,000 for cutting down a 207-year-old alligator juniper tree. Joshua Favrow pleaded guilty in federal Magistrate Court earlier this month to felling the tree without a permit. He told authorities he cut it down a year ago and returned in June to harvest it so it would appear he was doing so legally. Favrow says he planned to use the large slabs of wood to make furniture and sell it online. Favrow also was issued a $500 fine and banned from the Coconino, Kaibab and Prescott national forests while he serves two years of unsupervised probation. The Forest Service says the tree south of Munds Park dates back to 1807 and could have lived centuries longer.

  • Good news on economy pushes stocks to record highs

    NEW YORK (AP) — More encouraging economic news and friendly signals from the Federal Reserve cheered investors Thursday, as the stock market climbed to another record high. The gains came a day after the Fed made clear that it's in no hurry to raise a key bank lending rate, easing a major concern for the stock market. Eight of 10 industry groups in the Standard & Poor's 500 index rose, led by financial stocks. "The question isn't 'Why are we up today?'" said Dan Veru, chief investment officer at Palisade Capital Partners in New York. "It's 'Why aren't we up a lot more?' What you're seeing is the U.S. economy growing at a modest pace, not too hot and not too cold." Veru said it's an environment that allows the Fed to stick to a policy that coaxes businesses to borrow and spend and could fuel further gains for stocks. Two of three major U.S. indexes finished at all-time highs: The S&P 500 index gained 9.79 points, or 0.5 percent, to 2,011.36, while the Dow surged 109.14 points, or 0.6 percent, to 17,265.99. It was the second straight day the blue-chip index has closed at a record. The Nasdaq composite, meanwhile climbed 31.24 points, or 0.7 percent, to 4,593.43, well below its dot-com era peak. The S&P Financials sector rose 1.1 percent. Bank profits could rise if short-term rates stay low while the rates they charge on longer-term loans creep higher. The day began with good news about the economy. Fewer Americans filed first-time claims for unemployment benefits last week, according to the Labor Department. Weekly applications fell to 280,000, well below economists' forecasts. The four-week average, a less-volatile measure, also dropped. Major markets in Europe headed higher as voters in Scotland decided whether to break from the United Kingdom. Germany's DAX advanced 1.4 percent, and France's CAC 40 gained 0.8 percent. Britain's FTSE 100 added 0.6 percent. Scotland opened polling stations on Thursday for a referendum on whether the country should leave the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to become an independent state. Opinion polls have suggested the "Yes" campaign favoring independence is neck and neck with the "No" campaign that wants Scotland to stay in the U.K. "A 'yes' vote is likely to weigh heavily on the sterling and equities," said IG strategist Stan Shamu in a commentary. "A 'no' vote should result in a relief rally and is likely to be positive for the sterling and equities." The pound was trading at a two-year high against the euro at €1.27, and holding steady against the dollar at $1.64. On Wednesday in the U.S., the Fed maintained its stance of keeping short-term interest rates near zero for a "considerable time." Investors had speculated that the Fed might hint at an earlier start for rate hikes. Among companies making big moves on Thursday, Rite Aid plunged 19 percent after it cut its profit forecasts for the full year, laying part of the blame on higher costs for generic drugs. The drugstore chain still expects sales of $26 billion this year. Rite Aid's stock fell $1.23 to $5.41. ConAgra said its quarterly profits nearly tripled, sending its stock up $1.47, or 5 percent, to $33.48. Sales for the company behind Chef Boyardee canned pasta and Hebrew National hot dogs were flat, but other costs fell. Alibaba Group is expected to wrap up its mammoth initial public offering later Thursday, then make its debut on the New York Stock Exchange on Friday under the symbol "BABA." The Chinese e-commerce company could raise as much as $21.8 billion from institutional investors, making it the largest IPO on record in the U.S. Elsewhere, Hong Kong's Hang Seng finished 0.9 percent lower and Japan's Nikkei 225 gained 1 percent as the yen traded at a six-year low against the dollar. Markets in mainland China, India and Southeast Asia also rose. In commodity trading, prices for precious and industrial metals fell broadly. Gold dropped $9 to settle at $1,226.90 an ounce, and silver sank 22 cents to $18.52. Copper dropped 5 cents to $3.09. The price of oil fell on expectations of a quick return of Libyan production and continuing signals of lower global demand. Benchmark U.S. crude fell $1.35 to close at $93.07 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, a benchmark for international oils used by many U.S. refineries, fell $1.27 to close at $97.70 in London. In other energy trading, wholesale gasoline fell 0.8 cent to close at $2.561 a gallon. Heating oil fell 3.3 cents to $2.712 a gallon. Natural gas fell 10.3 cents to $3.910 per 1,000 cubic feet

  • Sierra Leone to shut down for 3 days to slow Ebola

    FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — In a desperate bid to slow West Africa's accelerating Ebola outbreak, Sierra Leone ordered its 6 million people confined to their homes for three days starting Friday while volunteers conduct a house-to-house search for victims in hiding. At an emergency meeting, meanwhile, the U.N. Security Council unanimously called the crisis "a threat to international peace and security" and urged all countries to provide experts, field hospitals and medical supplies. It was only the second time the council addressed a health emergency, the first being the AIDS epidemic. And in Guinea, seven bodies were found after a team of Guinean health workers trying to educate people about Ebola was abducted by villagers armed with rocks and knives, the prime minister said. Among the dead were three Guinean radio journalists. Many villagers in West Africa have reacted with fear and panic when outsiders have come to conduct awareness campaigns and have even attacked health clinics. The disease, which has also touched Liberia, Nigeria and Senegal, is believed to have sickened more than 5,300 people and killed more than 2,600 of them, the U.N.'s World Health Organization reported. In a sign the crisis is picking up steam, more than 700 of those infections were recorded in the last week for which data is available. During the lockdown in Sierra Leone, set to begin at midnight Thursday and run through Sunday, volunteers will try to identify sick people reluctant or unable to seek treatment. They will also hand out 1.5 million bars of soap and dispense information on how to prevent Ebola. Authorities have said they expect to discover hundreds of new cases during the shutdown. Many of those infected have not sought treatment out of fear that hospitals are merely places people go to die. Others have been turned away by centers overwhelmed with patients. Sierra Leone's government said it has prepared screening and treatment centers to accept the expected influx of patients after the shutdown. "Today the life of every one is at stake, but we will get over this difficulty if all do what we have been asked to do." Sierra Leone's President Ernest Bai Koroma said in an address late Thursday. As shoppers rushed to buy food and other items ahead of the deadline, some merchants worried about how they would feed their own families after losing three days' income. Much of Sierra Leone's population lives on $2 a day or less, and making ends meet is a day-to-day struggle. "If we do not sell here we cannot eat," said Isatu Sesay, a vegetable seller in the capital. "We do not know how we will survive during the three-day shutdown." The U.N. Security Council resolution was co-sponsored by an unprecedented 130 countries, reflecting the rising global concern. "This is likely the greatest peacetime challenge that the United Nations and its agencies have ever faced," said Dr. Margaret Chan, WHO chief. She added: "None of us experienced in containing outbreaks has ever seen, in our lifetimes, an emergency on this scale, with this degree of suffering, and with this magnitude of cascading consequences." U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon called for a 20-fold increase in aid totaling almost $1 billion to deal with the crisis. Several countries promised aid even before the resolution was adopted. France announced Thursday it will set up a military hospital in Guinea in the coming days, while Britain said it will provide 500 more badly needed beds in Sierra Leone. The U.S. plans to send 3,000 military personnel to the region and build more than a dozen treatment centers in Liberia. An American general has arrived in the Liberian capital of Monrovia to set up a command center. Ebola, which is spread through bodily fluids, puts health workers at a particularly high risk. Nearly 320 have become infected, and about half have died. A French nurse for Doctors Without Borders who became infected in Liberia was being flown to Paris on Thursday. With no proven treatment for the disease, public health experts have kept the focus on isolating the sick, tracking down those they have come into contact with, and stopping the chain of transmission through travel restrictions, the cordoning off of entire communities and now Sierra Leone's lockdown. Some patients have been given the blood of Ebola survivors in an experimental approach that some scientists think can help people fight off the virus. British nurse William Pooley, who was infected while working in Sierra Leone and has since recovered, has flown to the U.S. to donate blood to an American patient. Reached at his Atlanta hotel Thursday night, Pooley acknowledged he was there to donate blood to a patient at Emory University Hospital. But he — and hospital officials — declined to identify the patient or detail his condition.

  • Man arrested in fast-growing California wildfire

    PLACERVILLE, Calif. (AP) — A man with a lengthy criminal history has been charged with deliberately starting a Northern California wildfire that has shown explosive growth and driven nearly 2,800 people from their homes, authorities said Thursday. Wayne Allen Huntsman, 37, was arrested late Wednesday in Placerville and booked into El Dorado County Jail, where he was being held on $10 million bail. Huntsman faces a forest-land arson charge, along with a special allegation of arson with aggravating factors because the blaze east of Sacramento put a dozen firefighters in serious danger, forcing them to deploy their fire shields. They all escaped unharmed. The wind-whipped fire burned through 111 square miles and was 5 percent contained, according to California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. It closed part of a highway that runs to the Nevada state line near Lake Tahoe. District Attorney Vern Pierson declined to say what led investigators to Huntsman, who was scheduled to be arraigned Friday. He also would not comment on a possible motive, saying the case was ongoing. Investigators were in contact with Hunstman before his arrest. "It's something that's evolving at this point," Pierson said of the investigation. He did not know whether Huntsman had an attorney. Huntsman's sister, Tami Criswell, said she doubts her brother started the fire, but if he did, it wasn't on purpose. Criswell said she and her brother were raised in Santa Cruz and often camped. She said her brother, who has worked in construction and private security, loves being in the forest and always was cautious with campfires. "He's a really good guy," Criswell said. "He would never do anything intentionally to hurt anybody." Yet, Santa Cruz authorities have a $5,000 warrant out for Huntsman stemming from a Feb. 27, 2013, arrest for resisting or obstructing a public officer. Officials said he has failed to show up for several court dates. His arrest record in Santa Cruz dates back to 1996, according to court records. That year he was convicted of tampering with a vehicle, auto theft, driving under the influence, grand theft and assault with a deadly weapon, which resulted in a three-year sentence. He was sent to San Quentin State Prison. In 2003, he was convicted in Plumas County of receiving stolen property, the new complaint says. The blaze, which started Saturday, has been fueled by heavy timber and grass that is extremely dry because of California's third straight year of drought. It is costing $5 million a day to fight, Cal Fire officials said. "It is extreme fire behavior," said Michelle Eidam, a captain with the Sacramento fire department who was helping with the blaze. "All bets are off right now because this fire is so volatile." Many of the 12,000 threatened homes were in Pollock Pines, 60 miles east of Sacramento. Though the fire grew substantially late Wednesday and into the night, it burned mostly into wilderness land in the El Dorado National Forest away from the town, according to Cal Fire. Fire officials said there were no reports of damaged or destroyed homes. Still, residents at an evacuation center said they were worried. "We've been doing a lot of praying," said Sally Dykstra, who lives in a home in the middle of the fire area with her husband, Garry, 74, and her daughter, Stacie, 46. Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency late Wednesday, freeing up funds for the two fires. He also secured federal grants to fight each of them. Meanwhile, farther north in the town of Weed, officials released the final results of their damage assessment from a blaze that tore through the community Monday. City administrator Ron Stock said 143 homes and nine other buildings, including churches, were destroyed. Officials previously said 110 homes were destroyed and 90 others were damaged. Stock said he hopes the state will declare the burned debris hazardous waste to speed its removal and defray costs. The state would cover 75 percent of the cost and the city 25 percent if the debris receives that designation. Residents were expected to be allowed to return to the burned areas once utility crews finished restoring power, water and telephone service. The cause of the blaze was under investigation. The fire burned 375 acres, and more of half of it was contained.

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More From Sports

  • Surprise hosts free movie

    The City of Surprise and Coulter Nissan of Surprise present Movie Night at Surprise Stadium at 7 p.m. Sept. 27.“Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2” is rated PG.Participants should bring blankets and pillows, stretch out on the stadium grass and enjoy the free movie. Gates will open at 6 p.m.Surprise Stadium is located at 15850 N. Bullard Ave.For information, call 623-222-2000.

  • Harkins celebrates anniversary with freebies

    Harkins Theatres celebrates its 81st anniversary with gifts for moviegoers.“We are incredibly proud and honored to celebrate 81 years of entertaining Arizona,” said Dan Harkins, CEO and owner of Harkins Theatres. “The best way to commemorate the occasion is to give back to those that have made it all possible – our loyal moviegoers.”Through Sept. 25, Harkins Theatres is offering free drink upgrades on any size, regularly priced fountain drink to the next largest size, including one free refill for large and extra-large drinks.For the entire month of September, shoppers purchasing specially marked 24-packs of Coca-Cola products at select Albertsons, Bashas’, Fry’s and Safeway stores will receive a voucher for a free small drink with purchase of a Harkins Theatres movie ticket.For information and theaters near you, visit www.harkinstheatres.com.

  • Surprise seeks talented residents

    The City of Surprise is looking for its most talented residents. If you can act, play an instrument or perform a talent, be sure to audition for the Surprise Talent Show.Audition applications will be accepted until Oct. 3, and auditions will be held in mid-October. Applications can be downloaded at www.surpriseaz.gov/recreation or picked up at the Community and Recreation Services offices, which are at 15960 N. Bullard Ave.There is no fee to audition or participate in the talent show.The show will be at Valley Vista High School’s Performing Arts Center at 6 p.m. Nov. 7. There will be youth, teen and adult categories, and prizes will be awarded.For information, contact Michelle Holm at 623-222-2000 or michelle.holm@supriseaz.gov.

  • After record profits, airlines keep adding jobs

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of jobs at U.S. airlines keeps growing — although slowly — as some of them post record profits. The U.S. Department of Transportation said Thursday that the nation's passenger airlines employed the equivalent of 386,243 full-time workers in July, up 1.3 percent from the same month last year. It was the eighth straight monthly gain over year-earlier numbers. The largest employer, United Airlines, cut its work force 3.3 percent, while Delta, American, Southwest and US Airways added jobs. Two small, low-cost carriers, Spirit and Allegiant, had double-digit gains. Some regional airlines that operate shorter flights for major carriers cut jobs, including Envoy (American) and Endeavor (Delta), while others grew. The government counts two part-time employees as one full-time worker. Government bulletin: http://bit.ly/1qO0qsK

  • Good news on economy pushes stocks to record highs

    NEW YORK (AP) — More encouraging economic news and friendly signals from the Federal Reserve cheered investors Thursday, as the stock market climbed to another record high. The gains came a day after the Fed made clear that it's in no hurry to raise a key bank lending rate, easing a major concern for the stock market. Eight of 10 industry groups in the Standard & Poor's 500 index rose, led by financial stocks. "The question isn't 'Why are we up today?'" said Dan Veru, chief investment officer at Palisade Capital Partners in New York. "It's 'Why aren't we up a lot more?' What you're seeing is the U.S. economy growing at a modest pace, not too hot and not too cold." Veru said it's an environment that allows the Fed to stick to a policy that coaxes businesses to borrow and spend and could fuel further gains for stocks. Two of three major U.S. indexes finished at all-time highs: The S&P 500 index gained 9.79 points, or 0.5 percent, to 2,011.36, while the Dow surged 109.14 points, or 0.6 percent, to 17,265.99. It was the second straight day the blue-chip index has closed at a record. The Nasdaq composite, meanwhile climbed 31.24 points, or 0.7 percent, to 4,593.43, well below its dot-com era peak. The S&P Financials sector rose 1.1 percent. Bank profits could rise if short-term rates stay low while the rates they charge on longer-term loans creep higher. The day began with good news about the economy. Fewer Americans filed first-time claims for unemployment benefits last week, according to the Labor Department. Weekly applications fell to 280,000, well below economists' forecasts. The four-week average, a less-volatile measure, also dropped. Major markets in Europe headed higher as voters in Scotland decided whether to break from the United Kingdom. Germany's DAX advanced 1.4 percent, and France's CAC 40 gained 0.8 percent. Britain's FTSE 100 added 0.6 percent. Scotland opened polling stations on Thursday for a referendum on whether the country should leave the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to become an independent state. Opinion polls have suggested the "Yes" campaign favoring independence is neck and neck with the "No" campaign that wants Scotland to stay in the U.K. "A 'yes' vote is likely to weigh heavily on the sterling and equities," said IG strategist Stan Shamu in a commentary. "A 'no' vote should result in a relief rally and is likely to be positive for the sterling and equities." The pound was trading at a two-year high against the euro at €1.27, and holding steady against the dollar at $1.64. On Wednesday in the U.S., the Fed maintained its stance of keeping short-term interest rates near zero for a "considerable time." Investors had speculated that the Fed might hint at an earlier start for rate hikes. Among companies making big moves on Thursday, Rite Aid plunged 19 percent after it cut its profit forecasts for the full year, laying part of the blame on higher costs for generic drugs. The drugstore chain still expects sales of $26 billion this year. Rite Aid's stock fell $1.23 to $5.41. ConAgra said its quarterly profits nearly tripled, sending its stock up $1.47, or 5 percent, to $33.48. Sales for the company behind Chef Boyardee canned pasta and Hebrew National hot dogs were flat, but other costs fell. Alibaba Group is expected to wrap up its mammoth initial public offering later Thursday, then make its debut on the New York Stock Exchange on Friday under the symbol "BABA." The Chinese e-commerce company could raise as much as $21.8 billion from institutional investors, making it the largest IPO on record in the U.S. Elsewhere, Hong Kong's Hang Seng finished 0.9 percent lower and Japan's Nikkei 225 gained 1 percent as the yen traded at a six-year low against the dollar. Markets in mainland China, India and Southeast Asia also rose. In commodity trading, prices for precious and industrial metals fell broadly. Gold dropped $9 to settle at $1,226.90 an ounce, and silver sank 22 cents to $18.52. Copper dropped 5 cents to $3.09. The price of oil fell on expectations of a quick return of Libyan production and continuing signals of lower global demand. Benchmark U.S. crude fell $1.35 to close at $93.07 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, a benchmark for international oils used by many U.S. refineries, fell $1.27 to close at $97.70 in London. In other energy trading, wholesale gasoline fell 0.8 cent to close at $2.561 a gallon. Heating oil fell 3.3 cents to $2.712 a gallon. Natural gas fell 10.3 cents to $3.910 per 1,000 cubic feet

  • Cyberspace prepares for digital afterlife

    New York • Sure, you have a lot to do today — laundry, bills, dinner — but it’s never too early to start planning for your digital afterlife, the fate of your numerous online accounts once you shed this mortal coil.Facebook, Google, Twitter and other sites have different policies on dealing with dead users. Some states are also considering laws that would automatically give loved ones access to, though not control of, their dead relative’s digital accounts, unless otherwise specified.Unless you take action, you might not like the outcome: Would you want to give your spouse automatic access to your email correspondences? Should parents automatically be able to browse through a deceased child’s online dating profile?Now that you’re mulling your eventual demise, here’s a look at how some of the biggest Internet companies deal with deceased users’ accounts and what you can do to control your information.GoogleThe company behind Gmail and Google Plus has a tool that lets you decide what happens with your account after you die or become inactive online for another reason, such as moving to a deserted island off the grid with no Internet access. The tool is called “inactive account manager.”

Featured columns

  • OPINION: Woman’s journey alters history

    Times have changed. In the early 1800s, a 9-year-old girl and a flock of sheep were sold together for a hundred dollars. In April 2009, her portrait bust was unveiled in Emancipation Hall, the first sculpture to honor an African American woman in the U.S. Capitol.The journey of that woman, Sojourner Truth, from slave to abolitionist and women’s rights advocate is a remarkable tale.Sojourner Truth was born into slavery in Ulster County, N.Y. Her birth name was Isabella Baumfree. Her family was owned by Dutch speaking Colonel Hardenberg and his family. By the time Isabella was 30, she had been bought and sold by three different owners. As did many slaves at that time, she suffered physical abuse at their hands.She was totally unschooled and was unable to read and write. Yet, the year before she would have been freed by New York State law, she escaped to freedom.Isabella said she had found God in the solitary woods on her master’s estate. Her strength and endurance, she said, came from God. She renamed herself Sojourner — to reflect her mission to travel the countryside and teach about the evils of oppression. She took Truth as her last name, reflecting the purpose of her calling: to speak God’s truth. While her first language was Dutch, she learned English from a family for whom she worked, and then began a ministry to teach godliness and freedom for all.  True to her name, Sojourner lived and traveled widely. She lived in a Utopian community in Northampton, Mass., called the Northampton Association of Education and Industry. There she met abolitionists including Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison and gave her first abolitionist speech in 1844.

  • OPINION: Democrats will embrace filibuster

    During Harry Reid’s tenure as majority leader, there has been no dirtier word in the Senate than “filibuster.” On perhaps a million occasions, Reid and his Democratic colleagues have accused Republicans of using the 60-vote requirement to obstruct the Senate and prevent lawmakers from doing the country’s business.In November 2013, in a virtual frenzy of anti-filibuster agitation, Reid and most of the Senate’s Democrats exercised the so-called “nuclear option,” an unprecedented procedural maneuver that allowed a bare majority of Democratic senators to kill the filibuster as it was used against the president’s judicial and executive branch nominations. Reid left in place the filibuster as applied to legislation, but threatened to kill that, too, if Republicans continued their recalcitrant ways.That was then. Now, there is a very real possibility the GOP might win control of the Senate in November. For the first time in eight years, Democrats would find themselves in the minority. And you’ll never guess what some strategists close to Reid are talking about: Yes, Democrats are threatening to use the once-hated filibuster to stop Republican initiatives.Jim Manley, a former longtime aide to Reid who now works for the lobbying and communications powerhouse QGA Public Affairs, wrote a brief piece in The Wall Street Journal recently commenting on reports that Republicans are crafting a conservative agenda to enact should they win the Senate. Republicans can plan all they want, Manley suggested, but they can forget about actually passing their bills.“What everyone needs to realize is that there is no way that Senate Republicans are going to pick up enough seats to overcome the 60-vote filibuster threshold,” Manley wrote. “Yes, if they play their cards right, they will be able to pick up a handful of Democratic votes on some issues, but would still likely fall short of 60 votes.”That’s as clear a threat as one could find of Democratic filibusters to come.

  • Check drug labels for acetaminophen

    Acetaminophen (Tylenol and generic) is renowned for its safety, but it is a dangerous medication, according to Consumer Reports. Almost 80,000 people per year are treated in emergency rooms because they have taken too much of it, and the drug is now the most common cause of liver failure in this country.Though some of those tragedies stem from abuse, many are accidental.It’s not just that people are careless.Advice to “take only as directed” doesn’t cut it when the directions are confusing and conflicting.And with acetaminophen, they are exactly that.For example, the Food and Drug Administration has lowered the maximum per-pill dose of prescription acetaminophen, but it hasn’t taken the same step for over-the-counter products.

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Sun City West ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

Sun City West, AZ performs ALS Ice Bucket ChallengeRELATED: Desert Trails Women's Golf ALS Ice Bu...

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